How to stand out in a job interview for all the right reasons

Share this Article
Back to Blogs

 

Much has been written about job interviews over time and the ways to ensure that you give a good impression rather than tripping over your feet and ultimately not getting that all-important job offer.

But, these days, it’s not enough to just look presentable and give all of the correct answers to the questions that you’re asked. Employers are looking for that special candidate who stands out from all the rest. One who makes them think and isn’t just another number in a row of people.

If you’re looking to stand out in a job interview, make sure that it’s for all positive reasons and here are a few ways that you can do it:

 

Ask the right questions

Yes, it’s important to show that you’ve read up on the organisation you’re applying to, but to make yourself stand out, ask questions about the company, demonstrating the knowledge you’ve gained. Show your passion for the industry, intelligence and overall self-awareness by asking how certain current affairs have or will affect the company and the industry as a whole. Draw the interviewer into conversation about subjects relevant to the interview, get them off script, spike their interest and by doing so, show your passion for the role.

On the other hand, be careful not to ask questions that you should already know the answer to, such as ones where you could easily find the answer on the company website.

 

Pick a good weakness

Everyone dreads the infamous strengths and weaknesses question, but if it does crop up, be prepared for it. No one wants a list of all the negative bits about you, but similarly, it’s never a good idea to answer the weaknesses question with a thinly veiled positive (such as “I’m a perfectionist” etc.). Instead, look for something which is a flaw but isn’t massively detrimental to the role and demonstrate how you are working on managing it. For example, you might not be great at speaking to large groups of people or delegating tasks, but this is something which can be worked on.

 

Use your contacts

As well as finding out all you can about the company from what’s online, do you know anyone who already works for them? This could be a good way to get some real insider knowledge and show a real understanding of exactly how the organisation works from the inside. The more knowledge you can show you have of the sector, the better.

 

Show your passion and drive

In many finance and HR roles, experience is valued equally to qualifications. However, it might be difficult to demonstrate your experience level if you're just out of university or swapping over from another industry. Instead, look to show that you possess the kind of qualities that they are looking for in other areas of your life. Show commitment in talking about any volunteer work you’ve done, for example, or passion and drive in something you enjoy doing. This way, you’ll stand out as possessing the necessary attributes.

 

Post Comment

*
*
*
Building relationships in the workplace

Building relationships in the workplace

by Jodie Hayden

We probably spent more of our waking hours with our colleagues than with our friends & families. Should we be building relationships with our teams?

The modern appraisal

The modern appraisal

by Caterina Glenn

On far too many occasions employers use an appraisal as an excuse to dump poor feedback on their employee. The appraisal often becomes very one sided....

Alternatives to university

Alternatives to university

by Issi Briggs

Education isn't the only way to the top. University doesn't necessarily create a pathway into the world of work.

What makes a great place to work?

What makes a great place to work?

by Chris Goulding

Chris has judged the best company awards many times and speaks from experience about the criteria.

Benefits of temporary work

Benefits of temporary work

by Zoe Jones

There's more to temp work than the stigmas hanging over its head like a little grey cloud...

Overcoming talent shortages

Overcoming talent shortages

by Nathan Freestone

Frustratingly, there’s no hard and fast way to resolve this problem. However, there are a few things you can do help yourself in the short-term.

Managing workplace mental health

Managing workplace mental health

by Caterina Glenn

Employers need to know how to spot the signs of potential mental health issues, and what they can do about it. Support is essential.

Managing different personality types

Managing different personality types

by Issi Briggs

Have you ever considered management to be the cause of your staff turnover?