Step by step guide to resigning

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Congratulations, you’ve got the job, you have been successful at interview and received your written offer. So, how do you communicate and resign from your current employer?

I know resigning from your employer can sometimes feel a little daunting, especially if you have been employed with them for a long period of time, but hopefully this step-by-step guide will give you some insight on how to do so in a positive and professional manner.

 

1. Identify your reasons for leaving the job

You will have already done this before starting to look for a role and identified the reasons you want to accept your new role, but make sure you have re-clarified those thoughts in your head before resigning. You want to ensure you are articulating properly the reasons for leaving and phrasing it in a way that will not cause offence to your current Manager.

 

2. Let your employer know your intentions

Once you have made the decision the quit, it is respectful to let your employer know. Always speak in person, on video or the phone. Resigning should be a personal thing and simply sending a letter or email could harm the relationship you had with your manager. You never know if your paths may cross in the future and you will want a good reference, so it is important to make sure that you keep that relationship as strong as possible.

Whether you decide to speak to HR or your line manager, make sure that you are well prepared with what you are going to say. This conversation isn’t always the easiest to have and sometimes your decision can be met with uncomfortable questioning. It is important that you maintain composure and leave this meeting in the most professional and positive way.

 

3. Write a letter of resignation

As well as informing your employer in person, you should also give them written formal letter of resignation, this letter should contain your name, your notice period, when this will be in effect from, and it should also be signed by you. It is not essential to add anything further to your letter however a short thank you or positive message on your time with the company won’t hurt. I advise that you do not bad mouth the business or employees in your letter as these are often kept on file, this could reflect negatively on you.

 

4. Do not be tempted by the counteroffer

If you are a highly valued member of the team, there is a very good chance that your resignation will be met with a counteroffer. Your employer may pull out all the stops to make you reconsider your decision. At this point, you need to keep strong willed and remember your list of reasons for leaving. If you have discussed your frustrations and issues prior to resignation and they have not been resolved, why should it take you to hand in your notice for things to change? By staying put you could also be missing out on many great opportunities to grow and develop as a professional.

5. Ask for a reference

Resigning from your employer professionally will help to ensure you leave on a positive note, and will make it easier to ask your colleagues or managers for references. If you can get a letter of recommendation from your manager or former employer, this will endorse your candidacy, giving you an advantage when searching for jobs in the future.

6.Work your notice period

Work professionally and hard during your notice period. You want to both be remembered in the best possible light and not behave in a way that could affect your relationship. Your manager and those around you may be important in the future – as I have said a few times you never know when your paths may cross again in the future.

 

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